Property taxes are two dirty words that most people don’t like to hear.  Whether you pay them on a monthly basis through escrow or pay them as a lump sum yearly, no one likes to think this bill.

 According to a recent study by Zillow, a U.S. property owner pays an average of around $2,800, or approximately 1.4 percent of their home’s value each year in property taxes.

Unless you are an income qualified senior citizen you are going to have to pay these taxes, but you might not have to pay as much as you’ve been paying.  The reason is the way property taxes are assessed are not an exact science.  There is no single formula used by states and counties to calculate property taxes. In fact, more than 13,500 local governments have the authority to assess property taxes; all states allow local governments to set their own tax rates even though many states place limits on their rates.

If you are serious about lowering your property tax bill, then your first step is to learn how your local government accesses property tax.  Go to your local assessor’s office and ask them how they assess properties in your area.  More than likely you will need to obtain a “worksheet” for your property.  This is basically a scorecard for the assessor to know about your property.  For example it can tell them about your property size, house size, number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, etc.  If for example the worksheet says your home is 3,000 square feet and it’s actually only 2,500 square feet, then your assessment would be incorrect. 

To appeal your assessment, check with your local assessor’s office and find out what the appeal process is.  Most will want you to present an appeal in writing at least 60 days before the tax bill is due. 

Tax assessments are typically performed in multi-year cycles.  If the home values in your neighborhood or city have dipped since your last assessment, then you are probably paying more for your property tax than you should.  To get an accurate value of your home look for homes that have recently sold in your area or reach out to a local real estate agent to help you determine your home’s value.

Doing these things won’t guarantee a lower property tax bill, but you never know what will find until you start looking.

Property taxes are two dirty words that most people don’t like to hear.  Whether you pay them on a monthly basis through escrow or pay them as a lump sum yearly, no one likes to think this bill.

 According to a recent study by Zillow, a U.S. property owner pays an average of around $2,800, or approximately 1.4 percent of their home’s value each year in property taxes.

Unless you are an income qualified senior citizen you are going to have to pay these taxes, but you might not have to pay as much as you’ve been paying.  The reason is the way property taxes are assessed are not an exact science.  There is no single formula used by states and counties to calculate property taxes. In fact, more than 13,500 local governments have the authority to assess property taxes; all states allow local governments to set their own tax rates even though many states place limits on their rates.

If you are serious about lowering your property tax bill, then your first step is to learn how your local government accesses property tax.  Go to your local assessor’s office and ask them how they assess properties in your area.  More than likely you will need to obtain a “worksheet” for your property.  This is basically a scorecard for the assessor to know about your property.  For example it can tell them about your property size, house size, number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, etc.  If for example the worksheet says your home is 3,000 square feet and it’s actually only 2,500 square feet, then your assessment would be incorrect. 

To appeal your assessment, check with your local assessor’s office and find out what the appeal process is.  Most will want you to present an appeal in writing at least 60 days before the tax bill is due. 

Tax assessments are typically performed in multi-year cycles.  If the home values in your neighborhood or city have dipped since your last assessment, then you are probably paying more for your property tax than you should.  To get an accurate value of your home look for homes that have recently sold in your area or reach out to a local real estate agent to help you determine your home’s value.

Doing these things won’t guarantee a lower property tax bill, but you never know what will find until you start looking.

Property taxes are two dirty words that most people don’t like to hear.  Whether you pay them on a monthly basis through escrow or pay them as a lump sum yearly, no one likes to think this bill.

 According to a recent study by Zillow, a U.S. property owner pays an average of around $2,800, or approximately 1.4 percent of their home’s value each year in property taxes.

Unless you are an income qualified senior citizen you are going to have to pay these taxes, but you might not have to pay as much as you’ve been paying.  The reason is the way property taxes are assessed are not an exact science.  There is no single formula used by states and counties to calculate property taxes. In fact, more than 13,500 local governments have the authority to assess property taxes; all states allow local governments to set their own tax rates even though many states place limits on their rates.

If you are serious about lowering your property tax bill, then your first step is to learn how your local government accesses property tax.  Go to your local assessor’s office and ask them how they assess properties in your area.  More than likely you will need to obtain a “worksheet” for your property.  This is basically a scorecard for the assessor to know about your property.  For example it can tell them about your property size, house size, number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, etc.  If for example the worksheet says your home is 3,000 square feet and it’s actually only 2,500 square feet, then your assessment would be incorrect. 

To appeal your assessment, check with your local assessor’s office and find out what the appeal process is.  Most will want you to present an appeal in writing at least 60 days before the tax bill is due. 

Tax assessments are typically performed in multi-year cycles.  If the home values in your neighborhood or city have dipped since your last assessment, then you are probably paying more for your property tax than you should.  To get an accurate value of your home look for homes that have recently sold in your area or reach out to a local real estate agent to help you determine your home’s value.

Doing these things won’t guarantee a lower property tax bill, but you never know what will find until you start looking.

Jeramie & Christa Taber
2630 Memorial Blvd
Murfreesboro, TN 37129
Direct Phone: 615-533-8323
Office Phone: 615-896-5656
Email: jeramietaber@yahoo.com